Best answer: How has the Equal Protection Clause been interpreted by the US Supreme Court in key cases?

The Supreme Court has also used the Equal Protection Clause to prohibit discrimination on other bases besides race. Most laws are assessed under so-called “rational basis scrutiny.” Here, any plausible and legitimate reason for the discrimination is sufficient to render it constitutional.

How did the Supreme Court interpret the Equal Protection Clause?

Interpretations of the Equal Protection Clause

Ferguson (1896) was legal under the equal protection clause. … The Supreme Court found that ‘separate but equal’ was illegal under the equal protection clause because states were not, in fact, providing all people ‘equal protection of the laws.

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In which of these cases did the US Supreme Court interpret the Equal Protection Clause of the United states Constitution?

The meaning of the Equal Protection Clause has been the subject of much debate, and inspired the well-known phrase “Equal Justice Under Law”. This clause was the basis for Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Supreme Court decision that helped to dismantle racial segregation.

How did the Supreme Court interpretation of the Equal Protection Clause differ in the Plessy v Ferguson and Brown v Board of Education rulings?

In 1896, the Supreme Court ruled in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) that separate accommodations based on race was constitutional. 58 years later in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka (1954) the court ruled that separate accommodations based on race were inherently unequal and so unconstitutional.

How has the Supreme Court interpreted the 14th Amendment in relation to most of the Bill of Rights?

For many years, the Supreme Court ruled that the Amendment did not extend the Bill of Rights to the states. Not only did the 14th amendment fail to extend the Bill of Rights to the states; it also failed to protect the rights of black citizens.

Who does the Equal Protection Clause protect?

Fourteenth Amendment, Section 1: All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.

What is the equal protection clause in simple terms?

Legal Definition of equal protection clause

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: the clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that prohibits any state from denying to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

How did the Equal Protection Clause change the Constitution?

The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1868, granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States—including former enslaved people—and guaranteed all citizens “equal protection of the laws.” One of three amendments passed during the Reconstruction era to abolish slavery and …

How important is the Equal Protection Clause quizlet?

Bolling v. Sharpe states that there is an Equal Protection “element” to the fifth amendment. What other categories are included under strict scrutiny? Race, national origin, or status of a legal alien.

What does the Equal Protection Clause prohibit?

The Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment prohibits states from denying any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the law. In other words, the laws of a state must treat an individual in the same manner as other people in similar conditions and circumstances.

Did Plessy vs Ferguson violate 14th Amendment?

In a 7-1 decision, the Supreme Court ruled against Plessy, arguing that although the 14th Amendment was created to provide equality before the law, it was not designed to create social equality. … As long as separate facilities were equal, they did not violate the 14th Amendment.

Why is separate but equal inherently unequal?

Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment.

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Which Court case declared separate but equals unconstitutional?

The decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, mostly known for the introduction of the “separate but equal” doctrine, was rendered on May 18, 1896 by the seven-to-one majority of the U.S. Supreme Court (one Justice did not participate.)

How did the 14th Amendment change the relationship between the States and the Bill of rights?

Passed by the Senate on June 8, 1866, and ratified two years later, on July 9, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment granted citizenship to all persons “born or naturalized in the United States,” including formerly enslaved people, and provided all citizens with “equal protection under the laws,” extending the provisions of …

Which statement describes an impact of the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment?

Which statement describes an impact of the “due process” and “equal protection” clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment? Women were guaranteed the right to vote.

What did the Fourteenth Amendment have to do with the court’s decision?

Introduced to address the racial discrimination endured by Black people who were recently emancipated from slavery, the amendment confirmed the rights and privileges of citizenship and, for the first time, guaranteed all Americans equal protection under the laws.