What constitutes a safeguarding?

The Care Act statutory guidance defines adult safeguarding as: Protecting an adult’s right to live in safety, free from abuse and neglect. … as a result of those needs is unable to protect himself or herself against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.

What can be raised as a safeguarding?

Raising a Safeguarding Concern

Anybody can raise a safeguarding concern, for example they might be a carer, a professional working with adults with care and support needs or somebody who thinks they have been abused. They can raise a concern by contacting adult social care help desk directly on 01452 426868.

What is reportable to safeguarding?

Any individual or agency can respond to an adult safeguarding concern raised about an adult. This can include reporting the concern and seeking support to protect individuals from any immediate risk of harm (e.g. by contacting the police or emergency services).

What is a safeguarding concern in adults only?

What is an adult safeguarding concern? An adult safeguarding concern is any worry about an adult who has or appears to have care and support needs, that they may be subject to, or may be at risk of, abuse and neglect and may be unable to protect themselves against this.

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When should you report a safeguarding concern?

If you’re worried about the wellbeing of a child or a case of abuse or maltreatment has already occurred, you must report it immediately.

When should a safeguarding concern be raised?

If you still have concerns about abuse or neglect and it is not possible or within the scope of your role to have a conversation with the adult, then if in doubt continue with the process and raise a safeguarding concern.

What are the 6 principles of safeguarding?

What are the six principles of safeguarding?

  • Empowerment. People being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and informed consent.
  • Prevention. It is better to take action before harm occurs.
  • Proportionality. The least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented.
  • Protection. …
  • Partnership. …
  • Accountability.

Who would you report a safeguarding concern to?

This could be a friend, a teacher, a family member, a social worker, a doctor or healthcare professional, a police officer or someone else that you trust. Ask them to help you report it.

What may abuse of an adult at risk consist of?

Abuse includes: Physical abuse – including assault hitting, slapping, pushing, misuse of medication, restraint or inappropriate physical sanctions. Sexual abuse – including rape and sexual assault or sexual acts to which the adult has not consented or was pressured into consenting.

What are the 5 main safeguarding issues?

What are Safeguarding Issues? Examples of safeguarding issues include bullying, radicalisation, sexual exploitation, grooming, allegations against staff, incidents of self-harm, forced marriage, and FGM. These are the main incidents you are likely to come across, however, there may be others.

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How do you identify safeguarding issues?

How to Recognise a Safeguarding Issue

  1. Would you recognise abuse if you saw it? …
  2. Recognise both poor practice and more serious abuse. …
  3. Whistleblowing and Raising Concerns policy. …
  4. Carry out regular financial audits. …
  5. The Care Act & Making Safeguarding Personal. …
  6. Monitoring a person’s emotional and physical wellbeing.

What are the boundaries of confidentiality in relation to safeguarding?

Information about a child or young person should not be collected or retained without the permission of the parents/carers and they should have open access to it if they wish. Information should only be shared with professionals with the formal permission of parents/carers, by signature.